Encouragement, Writing

Feel the Hard Things, Focus and Write

Feel the hard things, focus and write.

Sometimes you need a push, a big one, not a nudge.

After a week of online writing classes, two (what was I thinking?), I felt drained, ready to throw the pen, shut the laptop down.

I needed to get still for a day, shut out the noise on the TV and my head.

If you’re lucky, it’s in those times when the universe, sends you messages and you listen.

The first message was a quote from Stephen King:

Writers and writing

I shared the quote on the closed Facebook group for the writers online class. If I felt like I couldn’t go on, I was sure others might feel that way, too. Many did.

The second quote came from a manifesto written by Courtney E. Martin. I read this article today, by Maria Popova, in her weekly Sunday newsletter, the wonderful Brain Pickings. Go to her site to read her inspiring post.

Courtney E. Martin, author and Wendy McNaughton, illustrator.

 

The poster is available through Etsy with proceeds benefiting Hedgebrook, a writers residency program. On Popova’s site, there are three different illustrations with links to purchase a framed poster.

Have a great week and keep creating!

Brain Pickings website: Creative Resilence and the Artist Duty

Encouragement, Writing

How to Murder a Draft, Resurrect A Better Story

 

 

Do you ever want to throw your work in progress away? Chuck the manuscript you’ve worked on for years?

If you’re a writer, you’ve been there and done that.

The last few months I’ve taken writing classes with an editor, Toni Lopopolo and her assistant, Lisa Angle. We’re a small group of writers who brave the weekly sessions with Toni and Lisa so we can become better writers.

I’ve learned I must swing a machete through a draft to become a better writer.

Wield your writing machete like Danny Trejo

Machete-wielding is a dirty job. You must be merciless. This will hurt, but it’s for your own good.

These tips will help you murder your draft:

  1. Pluck out backstory in the first pages.
  2. Delete the flowery prose that serves no purpose. This includes adverbs and -ing words.
  3. Hack out the ‘terrible 20‘ words that result in the passive voice.
  4. Throw away the ‘filler words.‘ They’re the excess fat.
  5. Cut out the numerous body parts “Her head swiveled,” “eyes squinted,” “eyebrows arched.”
  6. Take out stage directions disguised as physical movements.
  7. Remove events that don’t affect the goal. Either it doesn’t belong or the writer hasn’t communicated its importance.
  8. Slash the conversational dialogue.

These tips can revive your murdered or half-dead draft:

  1. Read “Self-Editing for Fiction Writers,” by Renni Browne and Dave King, before you start your revisions.
  2. The story must start on the first page.
  3. Write in scenes. A scene has a beginning, middle, and end (mini-arc). Each scene must drive the story forward. Tips on how to write a scene.
  4. Events, characters, description all must mean something. Remember Chekov’s gun?
  5. Enter a scene with the story already in motion, then leave early with an important outcome left hanging.
  6. Put a comma before ‘said,’ and a period before or after an action.
  7. Add danger and desire for drama or tension.
  8. Pump in great dialogue that’s confrontational, with opposing agendas. This drives the story forward.

Check out Toni’s website and find many more tips.

I enjoyed this presentation: The Most Important Writing Skill to Master and ‘What is Voice.”

Thanks for reading, double thanks for sharing this post. 🙂

 

 

 

 

Encouragement, Wisdom

Jesus Was An Amazing Social Activist

Seattle Protest, Nov. 9, 2016 photo by Ricard Ha
Seattle Protest, Nov. 9, 2016, photo by Ricard Ha

 

United We Stand: How do we get through the difficulties that threaten to tear us apart?

This was the topic of Sunday’s service at the church which I attend. Although it’s part of a series titled “Family Stuff,” it’s also appropriate for what’s happening during the post-Trump election.

Biblical scriptures are great like that, showing us that many ancient words still pertain to current circumstances.

The scripture used this past Sunday was Philllipians 1:27:

“Whatever happens, conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ.”

These words reminded me that Jesus was himself a social activist. Anyone familiar with the bible knows the numerous stories of him speaking and fighting against injustice. What is amazing is that he did so in a non-violent manner.

It has grieved me to hear about the racist incidents happening all over our country. Time magazine cited several. A compilation of Tweets enumerating hundreds of incidents on Day 1 in Trump’s America began.

Reading the tweets may anger you. The hatred is real and so is the pain. Don’t let these hateful things break your spirit.

The Southern Poverty Law Center has counted more than 300 cases of hateful harassment or intimidation in the five days since Election Day.
“They’ve been everywhere — in schools, in places of business like Walmart, on the street,” SPLC President Richard Cohen said Monday.

I’ve heard stories, from parents in my own city, that racist comments have been made in elementary school classrooms. That breaks my heart.

My comment to the parent was to report all incidents and ask the administration to gather an assembly, reaffirming that hateful speech and bullying isn’t allowed whoever the POTUS is.

I read this report today from a Latino legal civil rights organization.

MALDEF STATEMENT ON REPORTS OF POST-ELECTION BULLYING AT CALIFORNIA SCHOOLS

November 10, 2016
LOS ANGELES, CA – In the aftermath of Tuesday’s election, reports have surfaced of problems at schools, including anti-immigrant bullying. MALDEF calls on local and state officials to move swiftly to address any incidents of uncivil discourse in our schools.

Please attribute the following statement to MALDEF President and General Counsel Thomas A. Saenz.

“Every public school in the state of California is obligated under both state and federal law to step in to prevent and address bullying or harassment on any prohibited basis, including on the basis of actual or assumed immigration status or on the basis of race or ethnicity. These obligations are grounded in the federal and state constitutions; they have not and will not change regardless of who has been elected president or who is serving as president.

MALDEF calls upon school superintendents, principals, other administrators, and teachers to act promptly to address any bullying or harassment tied to the Trump campaign’s regrettable rhetoric around immigration and to take proactive steps to prevent such activity. MALDEF will not hesitate to take legal action against any school that fails to comply with its constitutional and legal obligations with respect to any such conduct.”

Now, I know all Trump supporters aren’t spewing racist remarks towards others but to those who believe electing their candidate gives license to their hate speech, they’re wrong and we have to combat these incidents.

On Nov. 9th, I took to FB, as many of us do to share, comment, vent, and lament.

“My son, in Denver, said people cheered in the streets last night, people wearing White Pride shirts. He’s uncomfortable, angry, and sad, like many of us. Fear ruled the night.
I woke up needing to process the choice most Americans made and began my day like all the others, reading my devotional. Psalm 39:7 appeared. It’s about hope.
Those of us who don’t like the choice will grieve but please continue to do the work you’ve always done for a better America, for all people. Do not let fear and hate destroy that work or dictate the next four years. Let hope rule the days to come.”

What can you do? What can I do?

Hope is what I will embrace. And don’t get me wrong, hope isn’t only a noun. Hope is a verb, too.  Hope as a noun is a feeling of expectation but as a verb, it is a desire for something to happen. Hope in action is significant.

Hope Journal, photo by Elizabeth M. at flickr.com
Hope Journal, photo by Elizabeth M. at flickr.com

 

Hope is not passive. I’m reminded by numerous scriptures that Jesus was not a passive man, or apolitical. He  confronted injustice, railed against tyranny, and engaged in ‘civil disobedience.’ Be involved with the communities that are hurting.

There are hundreds of things you can do as an individual or family to confront racist incidents. Start with your own family and talk about social justice in your home. Join a civil rights organization, participate in a local or state protest, talk to your kid’s teacher, confront hate, listen to others pain, demonstrate kindness and compassion.

If you want more resources, there’s plenty of people who’ve contributed their tips on the internet. Here’s a couple about talking with kids after the election and stories from the classrooms, What Do I Say?

“Whatever happens, conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ.”

 

Amazon Kindle, Character building, Encouragement, show don't tell, Writing, writing tips

Three Ways To Skyrocket Blah #Writing To Amazing

"Life in the Wall" project, by M. Ali, photo by Tim Green, flickr.com
“Life in the Wall” project, by M. Ali, photo by Tim Green, flickr.com

 

Last night I read my short story to an audience of 80+. My son, brother, and some friends came out to hear me read and accept my award, which made me a little nervous but their presence meant a lot to me. The positive comments afterward helped lift me up from the weariness I and other writers often experience since we usually work in isolation.

Most writers want to write AMAZING prose. Words so delicious that readers can’t wait to scoop up every tasty morsel and flip the page for more.

We want readers to feel emotion when we compose our sentences, to get goosebumps and shivers of excitement. We want readers to be inside the story. We want them to see what we see, hear what we hear, and be right where we are in our head.

Writers want to take the reader into the ghostly forest, a medieval castle, far-flung flung planet, or inside a prison.

So how do you amp up your writing?

  1. Describe what the characters experience without telling them the emotion, i.e. fright, sadness. Describe the sensory details. Use the five senses: Sight, sound, taste, smell and touch. There are really six, but more about that one later.

    Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass. Anton Chekhov

 

This is my stack of books on writing. The ones by Stephen King, Ann Lamott, and Natalie Goldberg are hiding somewhere:

books on writing, books on revision
My Books on the Craft of Writing-www.alvaradofrazier.com

 

All of these are great books for the mechanics of writing but my go to book isn’t in that stack. It’s on my Kindle.

book on writing craft, emotions thesaurus, writers companion on character expression
The Emotion Thesaurus by Angela Ackerman & Becca Puglisi

This book describes the sixth sense: Emotions. There are 75 emotions described by the possible body language cues, thoughts, and visceral responses for each. I also have the companion e-book called Emotional Amplifiers. (The latter book is free). 

2. Create compelling characters who have strengths and weaknesses, who are unique in their own way, and who have qualities worth rooting for or caring about. Show some physical characteristics, some language quirk and some personality. Give the reader a character worth remembering.

3. Create the mood by describing the setting. Again, the reader needs to be immersed in the story by visualizing the scene.

Here are some helpful tips on how to incorporate sensory details in your writing:

Creating sensory details in fiction
Tips for Creating Sensory Details

 

And here’s some handy tips for creating the mood of your scenes.

Tips on creating mood in stories
Tips on How to Describe and Create a Mood in Fiction Writing

 

These books, The Setting Thesaurus, aren’t out yet, but I’m watching Writers Helping Writers website for the launch date, which right now is June 13, 2016. I’m excited and marked my calendar for their arrival.

I’ve pinned these charts to my “Writing Tips-Fiction” on my Pinterest boards for future reference. You might want to do the same.