Champurrado-Mexican Comfort Drink, Vegan Style

Christmas came. It left me with a cold and cough. Unknown Mami recently blogged about her daughter, who “felt like cheese.” I know the feeling.  
Nonetheless, the tamales were wrapped, steamed and eaten. My sisters, mom, brother and boyfriend stayed up late chismeando, watching movies and snacking. This may have delayed my recovery from my cold, but our Christmas tradition carried on. 
 
Well, almost. 
 
The one thing I didn’t get to do was make Vegan tamales for my son or Champurrado for Christmas Day-oops, that’s two things. I did make a small pot on tamale making day, December 23rd, before the crux of the cold hit me, but one pot is never enough. Now that I don’t have to wipe my nose every two seconds and my sense of taste is coming back I’m going to make another batch for the kids.
 
Champurrado (cham-poo-rah-doh) is a Mexican hot chocolate drink married with an atole, a traditional masa-based Mexican drink. It is not Mexican hot chocolate- two separate beverages.
Ingredients for Champurrado

Ingredients for Champurrado


Masa harina
 is the flour used for making corn tortillas and can also be used to thicken this rich, chocolate drink. I use Maizena or corn starch. This warm and thick drink is made with piloncillo (the raw sugar cone up there), milk, Mexican chocolate like the Abuelita brand and cinnamon sticks. Sometimes anise star or vanilla bean is used. It’s comfort food Mexican style.
All of these ingredients are in supermarkets in the Southwest. If you’re somewhere else you can find these in a Mexican/Latino market.
Champurrado is served most often at Christmas time with tamales, pan dulce (Mexican sweet bread) or churros
Since I didn’t make the Vegan tamales, because I was feeling “cheesy,”  I gave Vegan Champurrado a try. I substituted cow’s milk for almond milk and Maizena (corn starch) for the masa harina. The results were delicious and passed the Nana (grandma) test. Here’s a recipe that will serve 8-10: :
 
Combine all into a large saucepan, stir until chocolate, sugar is well blended.
 
8 cups unsweetened almond milk
2 disks (3.25 oz)Mexican chocolate 
3 oz piloncillo cone
1/8 teaspoon ground anise seeds or one star anise 
4 whole cinnamon sticks
 
Add:
3-5 tablespoons of Maizena stirred into 1/2 cup of warm water (this is for the thickness), add to hot mixture, use a whisk or molinillo (kids love this part) to stir frequently until it boils. Reduce heat and cook for 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally. 

Substitutions:
Some people like half water, half whole milk, or all water. Experiment with the thickness of the drink by using less or more of Maizena. For a deep chocolate flavor add two disks. This also tastes very good when you use a vanilla bean instead of star anise.  

Mexican Champurrado

Mexican Champurrado

Pour champurrado into a small cup unless you need more comfort, then go for the big mug. By using the substitutions, you can make this recipe your own. Whip some up and enjoy something different this holiday season. Perhaps as you are sipping your cinnamony chocolate drink you can think about your resolutions for 2013. 

I don’t ‘do’ resolutions at the new year. Probably has something to do with this Mexican proverb (dicho): “Una buena resolución es como un caballo viejo, que a menudo ensillado pero rara vez montado.” 

Translation“A good resolution is like an old horse, which is often saddled but rarely ridden.”

Happy holidays and much joy, peace  and chocolate in the new year.

 
 
 
 
 


Categories: Champurrado, Latino culture, Latino Family Traditions, Mexican dicho, Vegan Champurrado

5 replies

  1. Thank you for this recipe. My mouth is watering. I was sick a few weeks back and my grandmother came over with her wonderful pot of atole, but I think I'm going to have to make this tonight. Hope you're feeling much better soon. All best to you in 2013!

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  2. Champurrado sounds delicious, and thanks for the warm wishes of joy and chocolate in the new year. The same to you! (Sorry to hear about the cold, though.)

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  3. @Andrea and Jennifer. Not that many people make atole anymore, including my own mother. She's the one that pushed me to keep the tradition of a hot Mexican drink for the holidays, and since I'm a chocolate lover, champurrado became that drink. Thank you both for your good wishes. Much love, writing, and publishing in the new year.

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  4. New Years resolution: I must go to Mexico to try all this delicious food before attempting to make it myself!

    Liked by 1 person

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