The A to Z Challenge: Y and Z

Enough (in Spanish, YA), photo by Rux Centea for unsplash.com

Last day of the A to Z Challenge: Today is Y and Z: YAY!

That’s a Y but we’re concentrating on Spanish words for this challenge.

Y is for “Ya” which means Enough, or Already, or “Enough already.”

When a Spanish speaking parent didn’t want to hear their kids continuing to ask/beg/argue for something, they’d say

“Ya!” or” Ya pues.” 

Z is the last letter in Spanish too. The letter is pronounced “Zeta.”

Z is for Zanahoria: Carrots.

The Spanish “z” is pronounced differently in Spain than in Latin America. In Spain, it is pronounced like the th” in the English word “think.” In Latin America, it’s pronounced like the letter “s.”

This is a word I frequently mispronounce as Zanoria, which I chalk up to my lazy tongue.

My favorite way to eat zanahorias? Roasted street carrots from Lazy Dog Restaurant.

Roasted Street Carrots from Lazy Dog Restaurant.

 

This recipe is a twist on Mexican street corn using organic rainbow heirloom carrots, garlic, queso blanco, cilantro lime crema, and Tajin. Tastes as delicious as they look.

In June I’ll travel to Spain and need to remember to use the “th” sound for zanahoria’s and not the “s,” or I may be served something else on my plate other than carrots.

Thank you for visiting and sharing. photo by hanny naibaho, unsplashcom

 

Taking on the challenge, and finishing, has resulted in little stories that I’d forgotten and reminded me that I need to learn more “proper” Spanish.

I’ve enjoyed visiting different countries and hearing stories through the A to Z challenge: France, Mexico, India, Germany and several states in the USA.

Thank you to everyone who connected with me here. I’ve followed a few blogs and look forward to reading your stories.

Gracias!

 



Categories: Latino culture

Tags: , , ,

4 replies

  1. The roasted street carrots look delicious. Congratulations on finishing your challenge.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Bravo, Mona for finishing the challenge! What a good idea to end on a tasty note. Your remark about the importance of a sound to make sure you’ll be understood reminds me of this old movie with the Olsen twin sisters in a French café and asking for “poisson” instead of “boisson” and being mocked. Poisson is fish and not beverage 🙂
    How lucky you are to visit Spain in June!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The roasted carrots look so good Alvarado! Also a nice Spanish lesson. I took 4 years in high school 25 years ago and often chatted with the fam of my Ecuadorian American friend en espanol but save trips to remote areas of Costa Rica and a solo trip to Peru, I speak little. Fun to revisit.

    Ryan

    Liked by 2 people

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