Travels with Mom

 

Gingko tree in autumn-flickr

Gingko tree in autumn-flickr

I arrived back to Oxnard, California from Denver yesterday evening from a visit with my daughter. Rain fell the night before, puddling the deck with water. My mother and I stood outside in the cool morning breeze to smell rain and touch the droplets pooled on the banister. California is in a drought and it’s been several months since we’ve had any rain.

The trip provided a look into the fall season with the brilliant yellow Gingko tree leaves, golden hues of Aspen’s and the russet blazes on other trees. I have no idea what kind of trees they are since I was born and raised on the coast.

Traveling with my elderly mom (she would hate that I used that word for her) also provided a look into our coming season. The child is now the mom and the elderly mom is like a child. Before anyone feels miffed about this description, it was said by my mother.

Mom can no longer see, walk, hear or smell very well anymore. She uses a cane and needs a wheelchair at the airport. She hates that she burns tortillas on the stove and can’t see or hear the television unless she sits within a few inches of it and has it on 45 volume.

Her decline in abilities has been in the last three years and for the last two years she’s been saying “This is my last trip, I’m becoming a burden.” 

The inability to do everything for herself is foreign to her, being such an independent woman all her life, and something she struggles against. (I talk about this part of her life here.)

The two things she misses the most? Driving and reading. The freedom to travel anywhere she wants whenever she wants. She is keeping up with progress of the Google Self-Driving Car. I can’t bear to tell her that the commercial sale of these cars is still about five years out. 

Google Self Driving Car

But with the reading loss, Mom is still able to read large print, albeit slowly, with her thick glasses that hurt her nose if she reads more than 30 minutes.

Before we left to Denver, Mom implored me to give her my manuscript to read (Strong Women Grow Here which is about an immigrant teenaged girl in prison). Mom used that “I might not be around to see it published.” Sad, but true.

Given that Mom is legally blind, 12 font on paper is not an option. But, I did figure out how to place the manuscript on my Kindle Fire and enlarge the font so she could see the print.

She read every available minute. Hearing her laugh, or frown, or say, “Ay, that Jester,” (the antagonist) touched me to the heart. We had conversations about prison life for female offenders, effects of abuse, faith and people’s ability to change.

“You have to get this published. It’s important, people will really like the story,” she said.

I love that she is my cheerleader. 

The above led to Mom’s musings about technological changes and how these do not favor the elderly except for her Jitterbug, which she can operate half the time. “They should think about the old people, we want to know what’s going on.”

She’s still waiting to find a computer she can use, because “No one prints photos on paper anymore. They put everything on that ‘Facepage.'” (She calls FaceBook everything but it’s correct name).

“And I want to read your blogging thing. I hear you write poems, is that true?”

So, I’ll see what I can do to find her an easy to use computer with a large lettered keyboard, so she can visit ‘facepage’ and my ‘blogging thing,’ because now her travels will be through a computer screen and her memory.



Categories: Blogging, Family, Female Offenders, Mothers, Parenting, Parenting our Parents, Travel

Tags: , ,

5 replies

  1. This is a lovely post, Mona. I love how your mom wants to read what you write and I totally understand how hard it is for her to learn how to use our new tools and also how challenging it is since she doesn’t see. A friend of mine is legally blind and she likes her iPad and Kindle because you can increase the size of the font. It could be a solution for your mom. I smiled when I read about Facebook getting all sorts of names. My mom used to do the same with all the English terminology related to the Internet and everything high tech. She doesn’t speak a work of English and it was funny since she mixed the words and said them with a French accent of course. But at least yours and mine try to keep up with the modern world. Some people stop caring and this is when you become old. Again, lovely post.

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  2. Beautiful post, Mona. I thought I was reading about MY mom who is around the same age as yours. It’s hard to see them decline, but that’s life. It’s inevitable. The good thing is that we have had them for a long time and learned much from them…their strength, independence, “joie de vivre.” At least we’ve had the pleasure of taking them on many trips and making many memories. We are also very fortunate that they’ve supported us as real writers! That’s awesome that your mom read your manuscript and my mom has translated four of my children’s books: amadairmaperez.com.

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  3. Thanks for sharing this, Mona. (abrazo)

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